OUR LATEST LITTLE ANGEL TO LEAVE US IN HER NEW HOME, PIC BELOW JUST COLLECTED FROM THE AIRPORT .... thank you for your mail below. WE GO THAT EXTRA MILE........

 

From: Hajni 
Sent: Monday, December 17, 2018 7:18 AM
To: Mijoy Yorkies
Subject: RE: Rosie information and newsletter

 

Morning Joyce

I just want to thank you for your complete dedication to Yorkies, thank you for  Rosy...she is the most amazing little angel with so much personality and spunk.   She has leapt into our hearts and blended into our household as if she was always meant to be in our lives.

I’m so thankful that I have found you as a reputable breeder!

Will keep in touch with the progress of the little madam as we go along.

 

Have a wonderful week ahead

Much love

Hajni

 

 

Breeders of all sizes of the Yorkshire Terrier specialising however in the smaller sizes

 

 

 

WHAT IS TARTAR? IS IT BAD FOR MY DOG?

Tartar is also known as dental calculus.

It consists of hardened bacteria. This hardened bacteria, or tartar, occurs when dental plaque gets stuck on your pet’s teeth and then comes in contact with their saliva.

 So what is tartar?

 

There are two types and one of them is more harmful than the other:

1. Tartar along the gum line

This type is called supragingival (above the gum) tartar.

It is often formed on the lingual surface of the mandibular anterior teeth – the outside of the large teeth in the upper jaw.

2. Tartar between the teeth and the gingiva

This kind of tartar is more harmful and is called subgingival (below the gum) tartar.

It thrives within the sulcus (gum pockets) between the teeth and the gingiva (gum).

 

Why is tartar bad for your pet?

If not taken care of at an early stage, tartar can lead to cavities and periodontitis (also known as gum disease and pyorrhea). These are a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the gum. Tartar could discolour the teeth and lead to bad breath.

 

Fact: Once plaque hardens and forms as tartar, it’s impossible to remove with just tooth brushing.

 

How do I spot tartar?

Initially, tartar is hard to spot.  It appears grainy and porous and usually has a chalk-like white colour. As it starts to harden, tartar turns darker in colour, usually in shades of yellow and brown.

Tartar is easy to spot above the gum, but not if it’s located below the gum.  Then it might be too late when you find out about the rock-hard layer of bacteria in your pet’s mouth.

 

How do I prevent tartar?

Now that you know what tartar is, how do you get rid of it? It is impossible to remove tartar by yourself just by brushing your pet’s teeth – it is stuck onto the teeth like concrete after all.

A veterinarian can remove tartar with professional techniques such as scaling.

But you can be your pet’s hero too.  You can prevent tartar from building in the first place!  Simply brushing your pet’s teeth every day will most certainly help.

There is also another measure against tartar that not everyone knows about. 

 

PLAQUEOFF™ FOR ANIMALS

VOHC accepted, ProDen PlaqueOff Animal does not rely on topical application or friction. The product is ingested and works systemically.

 

The natural compound in the product comes out through the saliva and works to break down the bacterial biofilm that forms on the teeth and gums. This is how the natural bacteria in the mouth take hold onto the teeth and gums, colonizing and creating the oral problems of plaque and tartar, bad breathe and gingivitis. It does not change the pH of the mouth or kill off the normal levels of bacteria.

ProDen PlaqueOff has been proven to reduce plaque and tartar on the teeth and gums, depending on composition, diet and how long it has been there. It then works to prevent bad breath, plaque and tartar from returning.

Patients generally begin to see results over a 2-8 week period, and will see further benefits with continued use.

 

 

 

The URGE to own that very TINY sized dog…   18 September 2018

I believe very few people totally understand how these small sized dogs are born, bred etc.  Most people think they are out there by the dozens, a good few to choose from and that could not  be further from the truth, HEALTHY SMALL SIZED dogs are not the NORM, never have been the norm and I doubt ever will be the norm. HOWEVER, THEY DO EXIST.

i find some people feel if they have owned a hamster, no different from owning a small sized dog, COULD NOT be further from the truth.  A hamster for one is meant to be the size it is NO dog is meant to be TINY.

You get the odd breeder who does the strangest things to produce these tinies, without taking into consideration the strange stuff, they do will impact on the overall health of the pups they produce. Something like INTERBREEDING,  Mother to son, Father to daughter and so it continues, producing pups and dogs with major health issues, the new owner has to contend with the majority of that pup/dog’s life which in most cases is not very long, SHORT LIVED dogs.

Producing small sized dogs as nature intended is what most dog owners would want and it can and does happen. 

I am going to include a mail I received only this morning from a member of the public which is the NORM out there.  Often when someone contacts me saying they want another small sized dog, they have one, I immediately ask them why not go back to the breeder you got your baby (which is now an adult dog) from??? The story is almost always the same, it has been the ONLY one they have ever produced or at the time they sold it to me, I bought it we had no idea it would turn out to be small and that too happens to me.  There are no golden rules, GROWTH charts, well those are not the best way to gauge any future adult mass of any pup, unless, the pup is born at a certain weight, and sticks within the weight limits every single week however, this alone is not GUARANTEED, the pup must be disease free, no internal parasites at all eg. worms, must eat properly from the get go and be fed properly. This story of they only drink form the mother till they are UMPTEEN weeks of age, is HOGWASH.

I have even had the public come to me advising me that they bought a pup that has been bottle fed, the breeder guarantees it is tiny. ANYONE buying a pup that needs to be bottle fed is crazy.  The mere fact it has to be fed tells one very big story, one I would keep well away from.  No matter how tiny any pup is it should eat and eat very well and the tinier the pup, the more frequent that pup should eat and that would be around the clock.

Anyone buys a pup and is told feed twice or three times daily this is NO SMALL future adult weight dog.

I am also inundated with the public advising me of a pup they can buy from someone out there, pup weighed x at birth now weighs Y what do I think? Firstly I cannot comment on anyone else’s pup.  So much goes into the raising of a pup from birth.

  • How many pups in the litter?
  • Did the pup get a fair share of mother’s milk?
  • At what age did this pup begin to eat?
  • Any set-backs of any kind this pup experienced? If so that alone will impact on the overall indication of the pup’s future adult weight.

We produce pups from NORMAL weight adult females and smaller males but not mice sized males, as those are not suited to any form of breeding.

We get pups that from day one are born at a certain weight, every single week from birth reach the goal weight, they reach all goals, we expect them to reach as a certain sized pup for a future certain sized, adult weight dog.

You do get the exception where the pup is born at a pretty high weight, as it goes along the dogs weekly expected weight gain drops significantly but selling a pup like this to the public is questionable as it may decide to have a growth spurt along the way and end up more to the indicated adult weight at birth,  than the going along week by week process.  So it is first and foremost very important to go with a breeder who does have some insight into the smaller sized dogs, don’t go on “hearsay either”, they should be able to show you what they breed, etc,  not necessarily their own dogs, but the people out there who own their dogs.

You must be able to trust the breeder of your choice,  we all make mistakes this is a process that is not easy by any stretch of the imagination,  but over the years you learn more and more.

NO really small sized pup should be leaving the breeder at 8 weeks of age. Many years back we used to do that when the new owner was pushy etc, however we have not sold tinies in years at that age.  OUR genuine teacups leave us at FOUR MONTHS of age.  Fully inoculated, health guarantees, microchipped, registration to follow etc. Sold strictly on a spay/neuter contract. Every pup of ours irrespective of the size will be sold as a PET on a contract. We have never sold the first pup for any form of breeding ever.

Every single pup we have bred for the best part of the last twenty plus years leaves here MICRO CHIPPED. This way that pup and ultimate adult dog will be identifiable.

We only sell our pups as PETS, not for any form of breeding. We will only see a GENUINE teacup pup to a qualified buyer.

Looking to purchase a proper SMALL sized pup takes time, we do not breed by the dozen, we do however pride ourselves in what we do breed and sell are guaranteed to be fully socialised, NO CAGE breeding, guaranteed to have an exceptional temperament, are quality, well cared for babies you can adopt and enjoy for many years to come.  If you want a small sized dog as in YESTERDAY don’t contact me, I will not be able to assist you. 

This is a specialised size dog small sizes are not the norm so be patient if this is what you are looking for.

I attach two photos of dogs of mine I used to take out to the Malls I frequented two plus years ago, I did this for many years,  however the attention they caused became a security risk to the MALLS and we were asked not to return with our four legged friends.

These dogs are all adult dogs, the heaviest weight is 1.2kg and the least weight 600gms.  First and foremost HEALTHY and solid built, robust dogs.

Sorry the pic with the shopping trolley is not the best, but it gives a very good indication of just how small these dogs are when they are in the well- known, small plastic PICNIC basket.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.....

 

Please be advsied it is a lot of peoples dream to own a small sized dog, but there are certain issues to take into consideration, before opting to purchase a TINY or SMALL sized pup.  THey are not suited to KENNELLING, they are not suited to staying in at a veterinary clinic, they pine, become distraught.  The most important condition of them all, ensure you want this size of dog for the right reasons.... They are not suited to the majortiy of dog owners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEACUPS the real info behind a GENUINE TEACUP pup…..

I get inundated with enquiries for teacups, people wanting another teacup, I always enquire as to the weight of their current teacup, I am amazed to hear they are 1.8kg , 2.2kg etc and this has been sold to them as a teacup and they honestly believe it is a teacup.

I just had a lady call me saying that it is so hard for the public as they don’t know the full story as to what a teacup pup should weigh, look like etc, so most are conned.

The adverts for micro- teacup, teacup etc, be cautious…. First and foremost a huge amount goes into the raising of any PROPER teacup pup so it is a pricey pup. However be cautious of that,  as I hear from a lot of folk out there who have paid the big bucks and the pup is still no teacup.

OR sad to say paid big bucks and the pup is in the vet clinic for a week or three and passes away and that is really big  bucks then.

FORGET SUCH THINGS AS GROWTH CHARTS EXIST…….. this is where most people have an issue, it is not guaranteed that a pup born at any particular weight will be the weight that growth chart indicates at birth, as an adult dog.  This depends on so many factors, that if you had to know them all, you would come to realise very few pups reach that expected weight goal as was predicted from their birth weight..

What is your idea of a teacup weight dog and work according to that.? People come to me for a pup and say TEACUP I ask what weight do you consider a teacup pup and when they find out just how small they are and can be they are in shock. NO idea such sized dogs exist. 

However be cautious, if you have any doubt get it in writing from the breeder of your choice, that you will have that pup to a vet, if for whatever reason the vet does not okay it as a healthy, robust  and a TINY pup you will be returning it for a full refund. BELIEVE IT OR NOT, so many vets are not too familiar with what size a teacup pup is supposed to be but most know that a rather fair sized pup is NO TEACUP pup.

 

 

Why do I suggest this is done? SIMPLE as one particular breeder was selling very under aged pups as teacup and every one of those pups and I knew of three incidents, where the pup was hospitalised, day’s later dead pup. This is a life at the end of the day, how can anyone be so heartless and cruel?

We have come a very long way when it comes to the teacup pup, owning my first one over thirty years ago.  They are rare, they are NEVER available in numbers so the minute you are told by a breeder I have so many sitting here, be assured they are not a teacup dog to begin with.

It is not easy to raise a proper teacup pup it is hard work, dedication and a labour of love, it is total commitment by the breeder.  A proper teacup pup will eat far more frequently and at a far earlier age than any other size of pup. So when you are told to feed twice daily or even three times daily and NO night feeds, you can be assured the pup is NO TEACUP pup.

Our teacups are here for four months.  They carry health guarantees they leave us being fully inoculated. Chipped, sold on a contract to be sterilised. they will be registered.

This is a RARE size of dog, weighing anything from 550gms to 1.1kg as adult and at these weights, solid short legged, short bodied, robust HEALTHY babies.

This is no pup to take lightly, hands on, huge responsibility, no spur of the moment impulse urge to own this size of dog. This is NO fashion statement.

We only supply qualified owners who are on a waiting list with us. This size of dog is NEVER here waiting for an owner. 

In the right hands, this pup and ultimate adult dog, will live, many long, happy, healthy and fun filled years with its owner and family. I say RIGHT HANDS as this pup needs to be in a home where its needs and the responsibility of owning it, is taken seriously.  Buyers such as these do exist, we supply those folk,  this size of baby.  This is not parlour grooming material nor is it boarding kennel material.  THIS IS A BABY IN THE HOME.

 

Thank you for your time……………

 

 

We do QUALITY not QUANTITY

We "R" the GENUINE TEACUP dog....

 

 

 

 

THE REAL DEAL, THE GENUINE HEALTHY TEACUP DOG

available to APPROVED homes only - waiting lists only....

 

NEWS FLASH!!!!

 

not just another toy.....

    

 

TUG OF WAR AT ITS BEST....

 

  

 

 

 

BELOW:  proud to say we bred her, photographed here lying relaxing on her back, thanks SALLY for the latest pic of one obviously very loved, biewer terrier 5 months old LOLA.

LOLA gives new meaning to the words OVER THE TOP CUTE

 

 

 

Our thanks once again to ROGZ Pet Insurance for this valuable pet aid advice when it comes to BURNS and your dog.

 

Burns: First Aid for Pets

Few injuries in pets are as traumatic, painful and disfiguring as a burn. Burns are injuries that result from exposure to flame or extreme heat, chemical or electrical trauma, and inhalation of smoke or noxious fumes. Most burns that pets receive come from a hot surface, appliance or substance found in and around the home. Often it takes time for the extent of the damage to be fully realised. Burns produce syndromes ranging from self-limiting injury to devastating long term incapacitation and potentially death. Both the temperature and the duration of exposure contribute to the degree of thermal injury.

Burns are generally placed into one of three categories:

  • First degree. Superficial partial thickness wounds involving only the top layer of the skin. The symptoms are generally limited to minor pain and redness. An example would be mild sunburn. These burns heal quickly and generally don’t require extra care.
  • Second degree. Deep partial thickness wounds involving the deep layers of the skin. These burns are more painful, introduce a risk of infection, take longer to heal and require veterinary attention.
  • Third degree. Full thickness wounds involving complete destruction of all skin layers. These burns are the most dangerous and life-threatening and required immediate and extensive veterinary care.

Sunburn develops in pets that are exposed to sunlight for an extended period of time. It typically occurs on naturally hairless areas such as the tips of the ears and nose; or if the pet’s coat has been trimmed too short, exposing the skin to the sun. This type of burn is usually first degree. It is painful but generally not life-threatening and resolve quickly. Chronic exposure to sun can lead to various types of skin cancer so must be avoided or sunscreen must be applied to exposed skin.

Electrical burns are most commonly found in the mouth as a result of the animal chewing on an electric cord. The lips, gums, tongue and palate may be involved. These burns are usually second degree and do result in tissue erosion and necrosis. Dogs are more often affected.

Diagnosing a burn is usually straight forward if the event is observed.

Burns that are not observed or are malicious in nature are more difficult to diagnose as most burns develop over time as tissue damage sets in and the lesions spread. In almost every case, a pet that has suffered a burn should be evaluated by your veterinarian. It is critically important that the effect the burn has on the animal’s overall health be assessed. Besides the burn itself, the pet may develop an electrolyte imbalance, kidney failure, anaemia and a systemic infection. The extent, location and percentage of the pet’s body involved in the burn all play a role in assessing and evaluating the long term outlook for the pet.

Prevention is always better than treatment so as far as possible limit your pet’s exposure to direct sunlight, flames, household appliances and electrical cords, chemicals and smoke.

If exposure occurs:

  • Extinguish all flames. If electricity is involved, make sure the power is turned off.
  • Avoid being bitten. Even the most loving of pets will bite when painful or afraid. You may have to muzzle your pet.
  • Make sure the area is well ventilated.
  • Apply cool water compresses with a clean cloth. Change the compress frequently and keep the site cool and wet. The area affected can also be submerged in cool water. This may prevent the burn from penetrating deeper into the tissues.
  • If the burn is from a dry chemical, brush away as much of the substance as possible. Be sure to protect the mouth, nose and eyes of you and your pet. Wash the contaminated area with large amounts of warm (not hot) water. Protect yourself with appropraite safety equipment. If the chemical has gotten into the pet’s eyes, flush with clean water for 15-20 minutes.
  • Do not break any blisters that have formed.
  • Do not apply any ointments or butter-like substances.
  • Do not apply ice to the burn.
  • Carefully transport the animal to your veterinarian. 

 

 

   

 

                               


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A cruel, unnecessary – and illegal – practice

We humans don’t have the copyright on body language: dogs use their tails for communication. A tail that is wagging quickly indicates a happy, friendly dog, whilst a tail that is being wagged stiffly slowly and deliberately indicates a warning that a dog is feeling threatened or unhappy, and that he may bite or attack. 

All of which calls into question the archaic, barbaric and illegal but continuing practice of tail docking. Further research suggests that when dogs feel stress, they tend to wag their tails to the left as a reflection of what’s happening in the brain. Activation of the left-brain causes the tail to wag to the right, activation of the right brain produced a way to the left.

The research shows that dogs wag to the right side when they encounter something pleasant.  When they see something threatening, for example, a strange dog exhibiting dominant behaviours, they wag more to the left side.  These results suggest that dogs notice another dogs tail wagging and use the information to decide whether the dog with the wagging tail is friend or foe. The researchers concluded that dogs aren’t intentionally sending signals with their tails, but rather the tail wagging is a consequence of the inner working of the canine brain. Tail wagging behaviour results from the way in which different emotional signals activate different parts of a dog’s brain. WIthout a tail, a dog cannot communicate his emotions or intentions, making it more difficult for people and other dogs to know how a dog is likely to react in in a certain situation and may even lead to an increase in dog fights. Tails also assist with agility and balance.

Tail docking is the amputation of a dog’s tail at varying lengths to suit the recommendations of a breed standard. Coking involved the amputation of the puppy’s tail with a scalpel. Sometimes, rubber bands are used, although this method has never been used by veterinarians.  The cut goes through the skin, cartilage and bone. This procedure is usually performed without any anaesthetic or with a local anaesthetic at three to five days of age.  A small number of dogs are born naturally without a tail.

Tail docking, even if performed with local anaesthesia, causes pain and stress to young puppies. Recent research in pain management indicates clearly that puppies, even at a few day s of age have a full developed nervous system and a well-developed sense of pain. Sometimes, tail docking, results in serious complications such as bleeding. Infection and even the death of the puppy.

Tail docking does not provide any benefit to puppies. Traditionally, some breeders considered a docked tail necessary to fulfil the working functions of the dog. Today many working breeds are kept as house pets and only a small percentage are used for field work, which is a recreational activity for people and not an essential function. If dogs of breeds that are customarily docked are left with intact tails, they are not more likely to get tail injuries than dogs of other breeds. If a procedure that causes pain has no immediate or future benefit for the animal and may lead to complications, surely it is unnecessary and should not be performed?

Tail docking is a procedure that is carried out because people believe that that is how that dog should “look” so it merely satisfies a breed standard or a human notion of what that type of dog should look like.

Some owners say that a dog with a long tail causes problems by knocking down ornaments in the house – well try rearranging your décor.   OR don’t keep such a big dog.

The SA Veterinary Council does not condone the routine of tail docking of puppies for cosmetic purposed by veterinarians. Any veterinarian who docks a tail “unless for justifiable medical reasons”, will be liable for prosecution under the Animal Protections Aca (APA) NO 71 of 1962.

Veterinarians found guilty under this act will automatically be investigated for unprofessional conduct by the SAVC under the Veterinary and Para-Veterinary  Professions Act 1982.



SINCE THE REMOVAL OF THE TAIL OF A DOG OR PUPPY RESULTS IN PERMANENT LOSS OF (I.E.DAMAGE TO) A BODY PART, THE PROCEDURE OF REMOVING A HEALTHY TAILS IS CONSIDERED A FORM OF MAIMING.



 

Lay people are also liable to prosecution under the APA if maiming can be proved. This falls under the ambit of welfare organisations.

The NSPCA is opposed to the unnecessary mutilation of animals for cosmetic, sporting, entertainment or convenience purposes – including but not limited to tail-docking, ear-cropping, de-barking, de-clawing, and myotomy (cutting of muscle).

The NSPCA takes the identical standpoint relating to the various surgical mutilations of other species. It has long been the opinion of the NSPCA that tail docking (as well as any other form of mutilation) is a contravention of the Animal Protection Act Clause 2(1)a which states:

“Any person who overloads, overdrives, overrides, ill-treats, neglects, infuriates, tortures or maims or cruelly beats, kicks goads or terrifies any animal…… shall subject to the provisions of this Act and any other law, be guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to  a fine …..  “Since the removal of the tail or a dog or puppy results in permanent loss of (i.e. damage to) a body part, the procedure of removing a healthy tails is considered a form of maiming.

According to the Kennel Union of South Africa (KUSA) none of their breed standards say that a dog’s tail must be cropped, but they rather say “tail customarily docked” or “tail traditionally docked”.

Dog owners may show their dogs with or without cropped tails.

Smallholders are encouraged not to buy puppies without tails and to insist that the breeder from whom they buy their dogs does not dock tails.

Above article copied from the SMALLHOLDER.  www.sasmallholder.co.za   June 2017 edition page 37

TAIL DOCKING BANNED IN SOUTH AFRICA JUNE 2008

 

 

   

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

There‘s no antidote for Xylitol toxicity.

However, quick diagnosis and treatment by your veterinarian can help reverse the toxic effects.  If you suspect your dog has ingested Xylitol you should contact your veterinarian immediately as prompt treatment is important. The prognosis is good for dogs who are treated before symptoms develop or for dogs who develop uncomplicated hypoglycemia that is reversed rapidly.

If liver failure or a bleeding disorder develops, the prognosis is generally poor. Most dogs who develop liver problems never make it.

 

Signs of Xylitol Poisoning…

Symptoms may include:

  • lack of energy or weakness
  • coordination problems
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • tremors
  • possibly seizures

Even very small amounts of Xylitol can cause symptoms such as seizures and liver failure, so be extremely vigilant when feeding your pet anything

Please read the ingredients labels of ANYTHING you feed your pets.  Some foods that are safe for humans are toxic to pets – Xylitol is one of those ingredients.

We recommend storing foodstuffs made with Xylitol in a dog proof location; our canine friends love a delicious cupcakes just as much as we do!lab-stealing-biscuits

 

 

Email :   mijoy@wam.co.za  

PEACE of mind, safety a top priority, know where you pet is at all times...

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

REGISTERED * MICRO CHIPPED * HEALTH GUARANTEES * 

FULLY SOCIALISED * EXCELLENT TEMPERAMENT GUARANTEED

HOME RAISED NOT CAGE BRED  ***  QUALITY NOT QUANTITY

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OUR LATEST LITTLE ANGEL TO LEAVE US IN HER NEW HOME, PIC BELOW JUST COLLECTED FROM THE AIRPORT .... thank you for your mail below. WE GO THAT EXTRA MILE........

 

From: Hajni 
Sent: Monday, December 17, 2018 7:18 AM
To: Mijoy Yorkies
Subject: RE: Rosie information and newsletter

 

Morning Joyce

I just want to thank you for your complete dedication to Yorkies, thank you for  Rosy...she is the most amazing little angel with so much personality and spunk.   She has leapt into our hearts and blended into our household as if she was always meant to be in our lives.

I’m so thankful that I have found you as a reputable breeder!

Will keep in touch with the progress of the little madam as we go along.

 

Have a wonderful week ahead

Much love

Hajni

 

 

Breeders of all sizes of the Yorkshire Terrier specialising however in the smaller sizes

 

 

 

WHAT IS TARTAR? IS IT BAD FOR MY DOG?

Tartar is also known as dental calculus.

It consists of hardened bacteria. This hardened bacteria, or tartar, occurs when dental plaque gets stuck on your pet’s teeth and then comes in contact with their saliva.

 So what is tartar?

 

There are two types and one of them is more harmful than the other:

1. Tartar along the gum line

This type is called supragingival (above the gum) tartar.

It is often formed on the lingual surface of the mandibular anterior teeth – the outside of the large teeth in the upper jaw.

2. Tartar between the teeth and the gingiva

This kind of tartar is more harmful and is called subgingival (below the gum) tartar.

It thrives within the sulcus (gum pockets) between the teeth and the gingiva (gum).

 

Why is tartar bad for your pet?

If not taken care of at an early stage, tartar can lead to cavities and periodontitis (also known as gum disease and pyorrhea). These are a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the gum. Tartar could discolour the teeth and lead to bad breath.

 

Fact: Once plaque hardens and forms as tartar, it’s impossible to remove with just tooth brushing.

 

How do I spot tartar?

Initially, tartar is hard to spot.  It appears grainy and porous and usually has a chalk-like white colour. As it starts to harden, tartar turns darker in colour, usually in shades of yellow and brown.

Tartar is easy to spot above the gum, but not if it’s located below the gum.  Then it might be too late when you find out about the rock-hard layer of bacteria in your pet’s mouth.

 

How do I prevent tartar?

Now that you know what tartar is, how do you get rid of it? It is impossible to remove tartar by yourself just by brushing your pet’s teeth – it is stuck onto the teeth like concrete after all.

A veterinarian can remove tartar with professional techniques such as scaling.

But you can be your pet’s hero too.  You can prevent tartar from building in the first place!  Simply brushing your pet’s teeth every day will most certainly help.

There is also another measure against tartar that not everyone knows about. 

 

PLAQUEOFF™ FOR ANIMALS

VOHC accepted, ProDen PlaqueOff Animal does not rely on topical application or friction. The product is ingested and works systemically.

 

The natural compound in the product comes out through the saliva and works to break down the bacterial biofilm that forms on the teeth and gums. This is how the natural bacteria in the mouth take hold onto the teeth and gums, colonizing and creating the oral problems of plaque and tartar, bad breathe and gingivitis. It does not change the pH of the mouth or kill off the normal levels of bacteria.

ProDen PlaqueOff has been proven to reduce plaque and tartar on the teeth and gums, depending on composition, diet and how long it has been there. It then works to prevent bad breath, plaque and tartar from returning.

Patients generally begin to see results over a 2-8 week period, and will see further benefits with continued use.

 

 

 

The URGE to own that very TINY sized dog…   18 September 2018

I believe very few people totally understand how these small sized dogs are born, bred etc.  Most people think they are out there by the dozens, a good few to choose from and that could not  be further from the truth, HEALTHY SMALL SIZED dogs are not the NORM, never have been the norm and I doubt ever will be the norm. HOWEVER, THEY DO EXIST.

i find some people feel if they have owned a hamster, no different from owning a small sized dog, COULD NOT be further from the truth.  A hamster for one is meant to be the size it is NO dog is meant to be TINY.

You get the odd breeder who does the strangest things to produce these tinies, without taking into consideration the strange stuff, they do will impact on the overall health of the pups they produce. Something like INTERBREEDING,  Mother to son, Father to daughter and so it continues, producing pups and dogs with major health issues, the new owner has to contend with the majority of that pup/dog’s life which in most cases is not very long, SHORT LIVED dogs.

Producing small sized dogs as nature intended is what most dog owners would want and it can and does happen. 

I am going to include a mail I received only this morning from a member of the public which is the NORM out there.  Often when someone contacts me saying they want another small sized dog, they have one, I immediately ask them why not go back to the breeder you got your baby (which is now an adult dog) from??? The story is almost always the same, it has been the ONLY one they have ever produced or at the time they sold it to me, I bought it we had no idea it would turn out to be small and that too happens to me.  There are no golden rules, GROWTH charts, well those are not the best way to gauge any future adult mass of any pup, unless, the pup is born at a certain weight, and sticks within the weight limits every single week however, this alone is not GUARANTEED, the pup must be disease free, no internal parasites at all eg. worms, must eat properly from the get go and be fed properly. This story of they only drink form the mother till they are UMPTEEN weeks of age, is HOGWASH.

I have even had the public come to me advising me that they bought a pup that has been bottle fed, the breeder guarantees it is tiny. ANYONE buying a pup that needs to be bottle fed is crazy.  The mere fact it has to be fed tells one very big story, one I would keep well away from.  No matter how tiny any pup is it should eat and eat very well and the tinier the pup, the more frequent that pup should eat and that would be around the clock.

Anyone buys a pup and is told feed twice or three times daily this is NO SMALL future adult weight dog.

I am also inundated with the public advising me of a pup they can buy from someone out there, pup weighed x at birth now weighs Y what do I think? Firstly I cannot comment on anyone else’s pup.  So much goes into the raising of a pup from birth.

  • How many pups in the litter?
  • Did the pup get a fair share of mother’s milk?
  • At what age did this pup begin to eat?
  • Any set-backs of any kind this pup experienced? If so that alone will impact on the overall indication of the pup’s future adult weight.

We produce pups from NORMAL weight adult females and smaller males but not mice sized males, as those are not suited to any form of breeding.

We get pups that from day one are born at a certain weight, every single week from birth reach the goal weight, they reach all goals, we expect them to reach as a certain sized pup for a future certain sized, adult weight dog.

You do get the exception where the pup is born at a pretty high weight, as it goes along the dogs weekly expected weight gain drops significantly but selling a pup like this to the public is questionable as it may decide to have a growth spurt along the way and end up more to the indicated adult weight at birth,  than the going along week by week process.  So it is first and foremost very important to go with a breeder who does have some insight into the smaller sized dogs, don’t go on “hearsay either”, they should be able to show you what they breed, etc,  not necessarily their own dogs, but the people out there who own their dogs.

You must be able to trust the breeder of your choice,  we all make mistakes this is a process that is not easy by any stretch of the imagination,  but over the years you learn more and more.

NO really small sized pup should be leaving the breeder at 8 weeks of age. Many years back we used to do that when the new owner was pushy etc, however we have not sold tinies in years at that age.  OUR genuine teacups leave us at FOUR MONTHS of age.  Fully inoculated, health guarantees, microchipped, registration to follow etc. Sold strictly on a spay/neuter contract. Every pup of ours irrespective of the size will be sold as a PET on a contract. We have never sold the first pup for any form of breeding ever.

Every single pup we have bred for the best part of the last twenty plus years leaves here MICRO CHIPPED. This way that pup and ultimate adult dog will be identifiable.

We only sell our pups as PETS, not for any form of breeding. We will only see a GENUINE teacup pup to a qualified buyer.

Looking to purchase a proper SMALL sized pup takes time, we do not breed by the dozen, we do however pride ourselves in what we do breed and sell are guaranteed to be fully socialised, NO CAGE breeding, guaranteed to have an exceptional temperament, are quality, well cared for babies you can adopt and enjoy for many years to come.  If you want a small sized dog as in YESTERDAY don’t contact me, I will not be able to assist you. 

This is a specialised size dog small sizes are not the norm so be patient if this is what you are looking for.

I attach two photos of dogs of mine I used to take out to the Malls I frequented two plus years ago, I did this for many years,  however the attention they caused became a security risk to the MALLS and we were asked not to return with our four legged friends.

These dogs are all adult dogs, the heaviest weight is 1.2kg and the least weight 600gms.  First and foremost HEALTHY and solid built, robust dogs.

Sorry the pic with the shopping trolley is not the best, but it gives a very good indication of just how small these dogs are when they are in the well- known, small plastic PICNIC basket.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.....

 

Please be advsied it is a lot of peoples dream to own a small sized dog, but there are certain issues to take into consideration, before opting to purchase a TINY or SMALL sized pup.  THey are not suited to KENNELLING, they are not suited to staying in at a veterinary clinic, they pine, become distraught.  The most important condition of them all, ensure you want this size of dog for the right reasons.... They are not suited to the majortiy of dog owners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEACUPS the real info behind a GENUINE TEACUP pup…..

I get inundated with enquiries for teacups, people wanting another teacup, I always enquire as to the weight of their current teacup, I am amazed to hear they are 1.8kg , 2.2kg etc and this has been sold to them as a teacup and they honestly believe it is a teacup.

I just had a lady call me saying that it is so hard for the public as they don’t know the full story as to what a teacup pup should weigh, look like etc, so most are conned.

The adverts for micro- teacup, teacup etc, be cautious…. First and foremost a huge amount goes into the raising of any PROPER teacup pup so it is a pricey pup. However be cautious of that,  as I hear from a lot of folk out there who have paid the big bucks and the pup is still no teacup.

OR sad to say paid big bucks and the pup is in the vet clinic for a week or three and passes away and that is really big  bucks then.

FORGET SUCH THINGS AS GROWTH CHARTS EXIST…….. this is where most people have an issue, it is not guaranteed that a pup born at any particular weight will be the weight that growth chart indicates at birth, as an adult dog.  This depends on so many factors, that if you had to know them all, you would come to realise very few pups reach that expected weight goal as was predicted from their birth weight..

What is your idea of a teacup weight dog and work according to that.? People come to me for a pup and say TEACUP I ask what weight do you consider a teacup pup and when they find out just how small they are and can be they are in shock. NO idea such sized dogs exist. 

However be cautious, if you have any doubt get it in writing from the breeder of your choice, that you will have that pup to a vet, if for whatever reason the vet does not okay it as a healthy, robust  and a TINY pup you will be returning it for a full refund. BELIEVE IT OR NOT, so many vets are not too familiar with what size a teacup pup is supposed to be but most know that a rather fair sized pup is NO TEACUP pup.

 

 

Why do I suggest this is done? SIMPLE as one particular breeder was selling very under aged pups as teacup and every one of those pups and I knew of three incidents, where the pup was hospitalised, day’s later dead pup. This is a life at the end of the day, how can anyone be so heartless and cruel?

We have come a very long way when it comes to the teacup pup, owning my first one over thirty years ago.  They are rare, they are NEVER available in numbers so the minute you are told by a breeder I have so many sitting here, be assured they are not a teacup dog to begin with.

It is not easy to raise a proper teacup pup it is hard work, dedication and a labour of love, it is total commitment by the breeder.  A proper teacup pup will eat far more frequently and at a far earlier age than any other size of pup. So when you are told to feed twice daily or even three times daily and NO night feeds, you can be assured the pup is NO TEACUP pup.

Our teacups are here for four months.  They carry health guarantees they leave us being fully inoculated. Chipped, sold on a contract to be sterilised. they will be registered.

This is a RARE size of dog, weighing anything from 550gms to 1.1kg as adult and at these weights, solid short legged, short bodied, robust HEALTHY babies.

This is no pup to take lightly, hands on, huge responsibility, no spur of the moment impulse urge to own this size of dog. This is NO fashion statement.

We only supply qualified owners who are on a waiting list with us. This size of dog is NEVER here waiting for an owner. 

In the right hands, this pup and ultimate adult dog, will live, many long, happy, healthy and fun filled years with its owner and family. I say RIGHT HANDS as this pup needs to be in a home where its needs and the responsibility of owning it, is taken seriously.  Buyers such as these do exist, we supply those folk,  this size of baby.  This is not parlour grooming material nor is it boarding kennel material.  THIS IS A BABY IN THE HOME.

 

Thank you for your time……………

 

 

We do QUALITY not QUANTITY

We "R" the GENUINE TEACUP dog....

 

 

 

 

THE REAL DEAL, THE GENUINE HEALTHY TEACUP DOG

available to APPROVED homes only - waiting lists only....

 

NEWS FLASH!!!!

 

not just another toy.....

    

 

TUG OF WAR AT ITS BEST....

 

  

 

 

 

BELOW:  proud to say we bred her, photographed here lying relaxing on her back, thanks SALLY for the latest pic of one obviously very loved, biewer terrier 5 months old LOLA.

LOLA gives new meaning to the words OVER THE TOP CUTE

 

 

 

Our thanks once again to ROGZ Pet Insurance for this valuable pet aid advice when it comes to BURNS and your dog.

 

Burns: First Aid for Pets

Few injuries in pets are as traumatic, painful and disfiguring as a burn. Burns are injuries that result from exposure to flame or extreme heat, chemical or electrical trauma, and inhalation of smoke or noxious fumes. Most burns that pets receive come from a hot surface, appliance or substance found in and around the home. Often it takes time for the extent of the damage to be fully realised. Burns produce syndromes ranging from self-limiting injury to devastating long term incapacitation and potentially death. Both the temperature and the duration of exposure contribute to the degree of thermal injury.

Burns are generally placed into one of three categories:

  • First degree. Superficial partial thickness wounds involving only the top layer of the skin. The symptoms are generally limited to minor pain and redness. An example would be mild sunburn. These burns heal quickly and generally don’t require extra care.
  • Second degree. Deep partial thickness wounds involving the deep layers of the skin. These burns are more painful, introduce a risk of infection, take longer to heal and require veterinary attention.
  • Third degree. Full thickness wounds involving complete destruction of all skin layers. These burns are the most dangerous and life-threatening and required immediate and extensive veterinary care.

Sunburn develops in pets that are exposed to sunlight for an extended period of time. It typically occurs on naturally hairless areas such as the tips of the ears and nose; or if the pet’s coat has been trimmed too short, exposing the skin to the sun. This type of burn is usually first degree. It is painful but generally not life-threatening and resolve quickly. Chronic exposure to sun can lead to various types of skin cancer so must be avoided or sunscreen must be applied to exposed skin.

Electrical burns are most commonly found in the mouth as a result of the animal chewing on an electric cord. The lips, gums, tongue and palate may be involved. These burns are usually second degree and do result in tissue erosion and necrosis. Dogs are more often affected.

Diagnosing a burn is usually straight forward if the event is observed.

Burns that are not observed or are malicious in nature are more difficult to diagnose as most burns develop over time as tissue damage sets in and the lesions spread. In almost every case, a pet that has suffered a burn should be evaluated by your veterinarian. It is critically important that the effect the burn has on the animal’s overall health be assessed. Besides the burn itself, the pet may develop an electrolyte imbalance, kidney failure, anaemia and a systemic infection. The extent, location and percentage of the pet’s body involved in the burn all play a role in assessing and evaluating the long term outlook for the pet.

Prevention is always better than treatment so as far as possible limit your pet’s exposure to direct sunlight, flames, household appliances and electrical cords, chemicals and smoke.

If exposure occurs:

  • Extinguish all flames. If electricity is involved, make sure the power is turned off.
  • Avoid being bitten. Even the most loving of pets will bite when painful or afraid. You may have to muzzle your pet.
  • Make sure the area is well ventilated.
  • Apply cool water compresses with a clean cloth. Change the compress frequently and keep the site cool and wet. The area affected can also be submerged in cool water. This may prevent the burn from penetrating deeper into the tissues.
  • If the burn is from a dry chemical, brush away as much of the substance as possible. Be sure to protect the mouth, nose and eyes of you and your pet. Wash the contaminated area with large amounts of warm (not hot) water. Protect yourself with appropraite safety equipment. If the chemical has gotten into the pet’s eyes, flush with clean water for 15-20 minutes.
  • Do not break any blisters that have formed.
  • Do not apply any ointments or butter-like substances.
  • Do not apply ice to the burn.
  • Carefully transport the animal to your veterinarian. 

 

 

   

 

                               


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A cruel, unnecessary – and illegal – practice

We humans don’t have the copyright on body language: dogs use their tails for communication. A tail that is wagging quickly indicates a happy, friendly dog, whilst a tail that is being wagged stiffly slowly and deliberately indicates a warning that a dog is feeling threatened or unhappy, and that he may bite or attack. 

All of which calls into question the archaic, barbaric and illegal but continuing practice of tail docking. Further research suggests that when dogs feel stress, they tend to wag their tails to the left as a reflection of what’s happening in the brain. Activation of the left-brain causes the tail to wag to the right, activation of the right brain produced a way to the left.

The research shows that dogs wag to the right side when they encounter something pleasant.  When they see something threatening, for example, a strange dog exhibiting dominant behaviours, they wag more to the left side.  These results suggest that dogs notice another dogs tail wagging and use the information to decide whether the dog with the wagging tail is friend or foe. The researchers concluded that dogs aren’t intentionally sending signals with their tails, but rather the tail wagging is a consequence of the inner working of the canine brain. Tail wagging behaviour results from the way in which different emotional signals activate different parts of a dog’s brain. WIthout a tail, a dog cannot communicate his emotions or intentions, making it more difficult for people and other dogs to know how a dog is likely to react in in a certain situation and may even lead to an increase in dog fights. Tails also assist with agility and balance.

Tail docking is the amputation of a dog’s tail at varying lengths to suit the recommendations of a breed standard. Coking involved the amputation of the puppy’s tail with a scalpel. Sometimes, rubber bands are used, although this method has never been used by veterinarians.  The cut goes through the skin, cartilage and bone. This procedure is usually performed without any anaesthetic or with a local anaesthetic at three to five days of age.  A small number of dogs are born naturally without a tail.

Tail docking, even if performed with local anaesthesia, causes pain and stress to young puppies. Recent research in pain management indicates clearly that puppies, even at a few day s of age have a full developed nervous system and a well-developed sense of pain. Sometimes, tail docking, results in serious complications such as bleeding. Infection and even the death of the puppy.

Tail docking does not provide any benefit to puppies. Traditionally, some breeders considered a docked tail necessary to fulfil the working functions of the dog. Today many working breeds are kept as house pets and only a small percentage are used for field work, which is a recreational activity for people and not an essential function. If dogs of breeds that are customarily docked are left with intact tails, they are not more likely to get tail injuries than dogs of other breeds. If a procedure that causes pain has no immediate or future benefit for the animal and may lead to complications, surely it is unnecessary and should not be performed?

Tail docking is a procedure that is carried out because people believe that that is how that dog should “look” so it merely satisfies a breed standard or a human notion of what that type of dog should look like.

Some owners say that a dog with a long tail causes problems by knocking down ornaments in the house – well try rearranging your décor.   OR don’t keep such a big dog.

The SA Veterinary Council does not condone the routine of tail docking of puppies for cosmetic purposed by veterinarians. Any veterinarian who docks a tail “unless for justifiable medical reasons”, will be liable for prosecution under the Animal Protections Aca (APA) NO 71 of 1962.

Veterinarians found guilty under this act will automatically be investigated for unprofessional conduct by the SAVC under the Veterinary and Para-Veterinary  Professions Act 1982.



SINCE THE REMOVAL OF THE TAIL OF A DOG OR PUPPY RESULTS IN PERMANENT LOSS OF (I.E.DAMAGE TO) A BODY PART, THE PROCEDURE OF REMOVING A HEALTHY TAILS IS CONSIDERED A FORM OF MAIMING.



 

Lay people are also liable to prosecution under the APA if maiming can be proved. This falls under the ambit of welfare organisations.

The NSPCA is opposed to the unnecessary mutilation of animals for cosmetic, sporting, entertainment or convenience purposes – including but not limited to tail-docking, ear-cropping, de-barking, de-clawing, and myotomy (cutting of muscle).

The NSPCA takes the identical standpoint relating to the various surgical mutilations of other species. It has long been the opinion of the NSPCA that tail docking (as well as any other form of mutilation) is a contravention of the Animal Protection Act Clause 2(1)a which states:

“Any person who overloads, overdrives, overrides, ill-treats, neglects, infuriates, tortures or maims or cruelly beats, kicks goads or terrifies any animal…… shall subject to the provisions of this Act and any other law, be guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to  a fine …..  “Since the removal of the tail or a dog or puppy results in permanent loss of (i.e. damage to) a body part, the procedure of removing a healthy tails is considered a form of maiming.

According to the Kennel Union of South Africa (KUSA) none of their breed standards say that a dog’s tail must be cropped, but they rather say “tail customarily docked” or “tail traditionally docked”.

Dog owners may show their dogs with or without cropped tails.

Smallholders are encouraged not to buy puppies without tails and to insist that the breeder from whom they buy their dogs does not dock tails.

Above article copied from the SMALLHOLDER.  www.sasmallholder.co.za   June 2017 edition page 37

TAIL DOCKING BANNED IN SOUTH AFRICA JUNE 2008

 

 

   

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

There‘s no antidote for Xylitol toxicity.

However, quick diagnosis and treatment by your veterinarian can help reverse the toxic effects.  If you suspect your dog has ingested Xylitol you should contact your veterinarian immediately as prompt treatment is important. The prognosis is good for dogs who are treated before symptoms develop or for dogs who develop uncomplicated hypoglycemia that is reversed rapidly.

If liver failure or a bleeding disorder develops, the prognosis is generally poor. Most dogs who develop liver problems never make it.

 

Signs of Xylitol Poisoning…

Symptoms may include:

  • lack of energy or weakness
  • coordination problems
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • tremors
  • possibly seizures

Even very small amounts of Xylitol can cause symptoms such as seizures and liver failure, so be extremely vigilant when feeding your pet anything

Please read the ingredients labels of ANYTHING you feed your pets.  Some foods that are safe for humans are toxic to pets – Xylitol is one of those ingredients.

We recommend storing foodstuffs made with Xylitol in a dog proof location; our canine friends love a delicious cupcakes just as much as we do!lab-stealing-biscuits

 

 

Email :   mijoy@wam.co.za  

PEACE of mind, safety a top priority, know where you pet is at all times...

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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